computer terminal

Add Full Permissions To Your User On OSX Using Terminal By Setting Ownership
Published: 15-Aug-2019

TL:DR

sudo chown -R \[username]:\[group] \[folder | filename]

You can modify a folder or a filename. That’s what the pipe ‘|’ symbol means.

You don’t need to specify group. So, you can do:

sudo chown -R \[username] \[folder | filename]

In case you copy some files from say, a Windows machine to an OSX machine, and OSX decides that the account you log in with isn’t allowed access. Sigh.

So, ‘chown’ will let you assign access. The -R flag is to go through all sub-folders and files contained and provide consistent ownership to the children of the folder you’re modifying ownership for.

By-the-way, use the ‘chown’ command because the GUI tool simply doesn’t work. Another sigh.

computer terminal

Add Full Permissions To Your User On OSX Using Terminal By Setting Ownership
Published: 15-Aug-2019

TL:DR

sudo chown -R \[username]:\[group] \[folder | filename]

You can modify a folder or a filename. That’s what the pipe ‘|’ symbol means.

You don’t need to specify group. So, you can do:

sudo chown -R \[username] \[folder | filename]

In case you copy some files from say, a Windows machine to an OSX machine, and OSX decides that the account you log in with isn’t allowed access. Sigh.

So, ‘chown’ will let you assign access. The -R flag is to go through all sub-folders and files contained and provide consistent ownership to the children of the folder you’re modifying ownership for.

By-the-way, use the ‘chown’ command because the GUI tool simply doesn’t work. Another sigh.